HMONG STUDIES NEWSLETTER
Fall 2008 (October-December 2008)

ONLINE PUBLICATION OF THE HMONG STUDIES INTERNET RESOURCE
CENTER (www.hmongstudies.org)

ABOUT THIS PUBLICATION: The Hmong Studies Resource Newsletter has since 2001 provided a very unique
and consistent source of up-to-date information about new works in Hmong Studies and
Hmong-related research resources. To access back issues of this online publication dating back to
2001 visit:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/HmongStudiesNewslettersindex.html

Hmong Studies Newsletter Editor: Mark E. Pfeifer, PhD

ABOUT THE HMONG STUDIES INTERNET RESOURCE CENTER:

The Hmong Studies Internet Resource Center (www.hmongstudies.org) is the online home of the Hmong
Studies Journal academic journal. The unique scholarly site also contains extensive bibliographies in Hmong
Studies as well as census data and an online research paper library.

Many of the Hmong Studies articles, books and dissertations listed in this newsletter and on the website may be
found at the Hmong Resource Center Library at the Hmong Cultural Center in Saint Paul, perhaps the largest
depository of Hmong Studies academic articles and dissertations in the United States. The Hmong Resource
Center Library of the Hmong Cultural Center is open to the public Monday through Friday from 9 – 5. Other
times are available by appointment. The Hmong Resource Center is located in the Hmong Cultural Center’s
offices at 995 University Avenue, Suite 214 in Saint Paul. Librarians: Xai Lor, Cher Vue and Ray Murray. E-Mail:

xailor@hmongcc.org
. Phone: 651-917-9937.

Link to Hmong Resource Center Library Online Catalog:

Walk-ins are welcome and there are many displays to look at that teach about the Hmong people, their history,
their culture and their experience in the U.S. over the past 25 years. Larger group tours and educational
sessions may be arranged in advance.

NEW WORKS IN HMONG STUDIES:

Books/Theses/Reports

M. Gabrielle Detjen. (2008). “Health and Acculturation of Hmong in the United States.” PhD
Dissertation, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
The author of this doctoral study conducted two focus
groups to assess the Hmong community’s perceptions of health and acculturation. In addition, the researcher
used data from a random sample of more than 500 Hmong in Wisconsin to examine the health concerns
affecting the Hmong population, the population’s acculturation level, and the ways in which acculturation
impacts Hmong health.

Douglas Chuedoua Vue. (2008). “The Three Eras of Hmong Educational History in Laos: French
Colonial, Laotian Independence, and USAID, 1917-1975.” PhD Dissertation, Capella University.
The
author of this graduate study gathered information from primary sources and interviewed experts involved with
the history of Hmong education in Laos. The researcher synthesizes, documents, and reinterprets the history
of Hmong education in three major education eras. These include the French Colonial Era (1917-1954), the
Laotian independence era (1954-1959), and the USAID era and the Secret War period (1960-1975).

Academic Journal Articles/Other

David N. Bengston, Michele Schermann, Maikia Moua, and Tou Thai Lee. (2008). "Listening to
Neglected Voices: Hmong and Public Lands in Minnesota and Wisconsin."Society and Natural
Resources 21(10): 876-90.
This article describes a series of focus groups that were held with Hmong
Americans in Minnesota and Wisconsin which explored their experiences and perspectives related to public
lands. The focus group participants discussed deeply held cultural and personal ties to the natural world and
the importance of public lands to many Hmong. However, they also noted ongoing problems and concerns
including perceptions of racism, discrimination and harassment from public land managers and other agency
staff as well from other recreationists and private landowners. The focus group participants provided
suggestions for improvement and information about the special needs of new refugees who have arrived in the
U.S. since 2004.   

Lisa Franzen and Chery Smith. (2008). “Acculturation and Environmental Change Impacts Dietary
Habits among Adult Hmong.” Appetite (Available Online 20 September 2008), 11 Pages.
The authors of
this study conducted focus groups with Hmong adults in Minneapolis-St. Paul in order to investigate how
environmental factors, acculturation, and food insecurity impact dietary behavior, body mass index (BMI), and
health. The authors observed that the cultural values of Hmong adults impact eating and lifestyle behaviors,
food insecurity history affects post-migration behavior and acculturation influences BMI through exercise and
diet.

Mousung Lee and Na’im Madyun. (2008). “School Racial Composition and Academic Achievement:
the case of Hmong LEP students in the USA.” Educational Studies 34(4): 319-331.
This St. Paul,
Minnesota-based study finds support to suggest that within-school segregation may hinder the achievement of
Hmong limited English proficient (LEP) students. The authors’ review of data indicated that the more diverse a
school became, the higher the achievement of Hmong LEP students.

Prasit Leepreecha (2008). "Role of Media Technology in Reproducing Hmong Ethnic Identity."  In
Don McCaskill, Prasit Leepreecha and Shaoying He, eds. Living in a Globalized World: Ethnic
Minorities in the Greater Mekong Region. Bangkok: Mekong Press, pp. 89-113.
This book chapter
examines how Hmong residing in different Asian countries are using media technologies to reproduce and
reconstruct Hmong ethnic identity. The article is based on fieldwork in Hmong communities in Northern
Thailand, Yunnan province of China and Northern Vietnam.

Pranee Liamputtong. (2008). “Traditional Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices Regarding the Health
and Well-being of Children Amongst Hmong and Thai immigrants in Australia.” In Patricia I.
Eddington and Umberto V. Mastolli, Eds. Health Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices, New York:
Biomedical Books, pp. 149-164.
This book chapter explores traditional knowledge, attitudes and practices
related to the health and well-being of infants and children amongst Hmong and Thai refugees and immigrants
in Australia.

Don McCaskill. (2008). "Fix and Flux: the transformation of Hmong Culture and Identity." In Don
McCaskill, Prasit Leepreecha and Shaoying He, eds. Living in a Globalized World: Ethnic Minorities
in the Greater Mekong Region. Bangkok: Mekong Press, p. 277-318.
This book chapter assesses the
contradictory and divergent impacts of globalization and nationalism on the culture and identities of Hmong
residing in a village in Northern Thailand.

Don McCaskill, Prasit Leepreecha and Shaoying He. (2008). "Globalization, Nationalism, Regionalism
and Ethnic Minorities in the Greater Mekong Subregion: A Comparative Analysis." In Don McCaskill,
Prasit Leepreecha and Shaoying He, eds. Living in a Globalized World: Ethnic Minorities in the
Greater Mekong Region. Bangkok: Mekong Press, pp. 1-57.
This chapter article provides an overview of
the status and situation of Hmong and other major ethnic minority groups in Thailand, Laos, Vietnam,
Southwestern China, and Burma with an emphasis upon the impact of Globalization, Regionalism and
Nationalism. The second half of the article discusses the findings of a related comparative study of Hmong,
Mien and Dai in China, Thailand, Vietnam and Laos.

John Oeltmann et al. (2008). “Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Outbreak among U.S.-bound Hmong
Refugees, Thailand, 2005.” Emerging Infectious Diseases 14(11): 1715-1721.
This article reports on a
study of TB and drug resistance, enhanced TB screenings, and expanded treatment capacity for Hmong
refugees remaining in Wat Tham Krabok in Thailand in 2005. This may article may be viewed online at the
following link:
http://www.cdc.gov/eid/content/14/11/1715.htm

Ronald S. Rochon, Clifton S. Tanabe and Tamara H. Horstman-Riphahn. (2008). “Does She Speak
English? Hmong Educators in Western Wisconsin.” In Maria Estela Brisk, Ed., Language, Culture,
and Community in Teacher Education. New York: L. Erlbaum Associates, p. 227-248.
This book chapter
discusses ways in which successful educators of Hmong origin in Wisconsin have prepared themselves to deal
with prejudices and how they have attempted to overcome stereotypes in their efforts to become fully certified
public school teachers in Wisconsin.

Louisa Schein and Va-Megn Thao. (2008). “Violence, Hmong American Visibility, and the
Precariousness of Asian Race.” PMLA: Publications of the Modern Language Association of America
123(5): 1752-1756.
This article assesses the representations of Asian Americans and violence in the American
media. The authors focus on heavily publicized incidents involving Hmong and Korean Americans.

Nguyen Van Thang, and Nguyen Thi Minh Nguyet. (2008). "Changes in Healing Practices among the
Hmong in Vietnam." In Don McCaskill, Prasit Leepreecha and Shaoying He, eds. Living in a
Globalized World: Ethnic Minorities in the Greater Mekong Region. Bangkok: Mekong Press, pp. 115-
140.
This book chapter describes how Hmong healing practices in Vietnam have been affected over time by
globalization and nationalism. The researchers conducted fieldwork in 3 Hmong villages located in Northwest
Vietnam.

Zha Blong Xiong and Kao Kalia Yang and Jesse Kao Lee. (2008).   “What Helps and Hinders Hmong
Pre-Kindergartners’ School Readiness: Learning from and about the Hmong in St. Paul, Minnesota.”
Research Report. St. Paul, MN: Ready 4 K, 35 Pages.
 This research report assesses the conditions that
have an impact on Hmong families and the learning and contextual environments of Hmong pre-Kindergartners
in Minnesota. The report consists of both quantitative data analysis from a variety of sources as well as
qualitative data analysis from ten focus groups organized with Hmong parents, grandparents, child care
providers, and educators. This report may be viewed online at the following link:  
http://www.ready4k.
org/vertical/Sites/%7BC2E38BFF-E19D-4F31-8282-94D11BD421A4%7D/uploads/%7B0712DB5F-3755-4DC7-
8E31-E733674FECAD%7D.PDF

Zha Blong Xiong, Kathryn D. Rettig and Arunya Tuicomepee. (2008). “Differences in Nonshared
Individual, School, and Family Variables Between Delinquent and Nondelinquent Hmong
Adolescents.” The Journal of Psychology 142(4): 337-355.
This study investigated whether there are
differences between delinquent and nondelinquent Hmong immigrant siblings on multiple, nonshared individual,
school and family variables. The researchers observed that delinquent and nondelinquent sibling groups were
significantly different in their participation in organized activities, antisocial attitudes, school truancy, school
performance, delinquent behaviors and parents’ labeling.


A BIBLIOGRAPHIC GUIDE TO HMONG STUDIES RESEARCH 2005-2008 NOW
AVAILABLE ONLINE:

A new bibliographic guide to Hmong Studies research published between 2005-2008 is now available for
viewing at:
http://hmongstudies.org/ABibliographicGuidetoRecentHmongResearch.pdf

NATIONAL LEVEL HMONG DATA NOW AVAILABLE FROM THE 2007 AMERICAN
COMMUNITY SURVEY:

The U.S. Census Bureau released national-level Hmong data from the 2007 American Community Survey at
the end of August 2008. View the new data here:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/2007SEAAmericanCommunitySurvey.html

For a tutorial about how to access Hmong census data online visit:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/AccessingHmongCensusData.html


COMPREHENSIVE HMONG STUDIES RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHIES ARE
ONLINE:

Doing research on a Hmong Studies research topic? More than 30 Comprehensive and frequently updated
online subject bibliographies of Hmong Studies works are available at the following link:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/HmongBibliographies

A newly created 2007-Present research bibliography is updated every few weeks with information about the
latest research publications in Hmong Studies, online links to text are included where applicable:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/HmongStudiesPublications2007Present.html

ADDITIONAL VOLUMES OF HMONG STUDIES JOURNAL AVAILABLE IN PRINT:

Volumes 4-8 of the Hmong Studies Journal are now available for order in a physical, print format. For more info
visit the following link:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/HSJPrintingsPR08.html

ONLINE RESEARCH LIBRARY AT HMONG STUDIES INTERNET RESOURCE
CENTER:

A growing library of links to full-text research articles and other documents related to Hmong Studies and
Southeast Asian American Studies is available at the following link:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/OnlineLibrary.html

UPDATES AT HMONG STUDIES INTERNET RESOURCE CENTER AND HMONG
CULTURAL CENTER WEBSITES:

The Hmong Studies Internet Resource Center website is updated several times a month with research oriented
features. To view this site one may visit the following link:
www.hmongstudies.org

The Hmong Cultural Center in Saint Paul has added a new blog, calendar and other features at its website. To
visit the site, click on the following link:
www.hmongcc.org

Qeej performance videos and pictures from Hmong Cultural Center’s 2008 Fundraising Banquet held
November 9, 2008 have also been posted at
www.hmongcc.org under “What’s New”

3 new videos of lectures in the Building Bridges multicultural education program by Txongpao Lee, Hmong
Cultural Center Executive Director have been posted.

Hmong Shamanism
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=8433917489102710972&hl=en

The Hmong Marriage Ceremony
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QlvXgRjlhi4

The Hmong Funeral Ceremony
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-2507884663001167459&hl=en

View the complete Hmong Cultural Center video library here:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/LearnaboutHmongvideos2007


HMONG CULTURAL CENTER’S RESOURCE CENTER LIBRARY ONLINE
CATALOG HOLDINGS LISTS:

Hmong Cultural Center in Saint Paul provides lists of holdings in its Resource Center library on its website at
www.hmongcc.org. The library section of the center’s website may be reached at:
http://www.hmongcc.org/ResourceCenterLibrary.html

Hmong Cultural Center’s library collection includes the following:

- About 600 Hmong-related books and periodicals. A complete and updated list (Summer 2008) is here:
http://hmongcc.org/BookIndexlist08.pdf

More than 300 Hmong-related dissertations and theses. A complete and updated list (Summer 2008) is here:
http://hmongcc.org/DissertationandThesisDoublelinesheet08.pdf

- About 750 Hmong-related academic journal articles from peer-reviewed journals. A  list of the journal articles
in the collection is here:
http://hmongcc.org/AcademicJournalsIndex.pdf

More comprehensive in its focus than any university or public library, the Hmong Cultural Center Resource
Library is the largest collection of Hmong-related academic research publications in Minnesota and most likely
the United States. The most distinctive and specialized portions of the library are the dissertations/theses and
peer-reviewed journal article collections.

For information about using this unique, special collections library call Xai Lor, Cher Vue or Ray Murray at 651-
917-9937.

HMONG STUDIES RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY PUBLISHED:

A bibliography consisting of more than 600 annotations of Hmong Studies-related scholarly research works
published between 1996-2006 has been released by The Scarecrow Press, a subsidiary of Rowman Littlefield
specializing in academic bibliographies and reference works. This new volume represents the first Hmong
Studies annotated research bibliography published since the mid-1990s. To learn more about this work visit the
following webpage:
 http://www.scarecrowpress.com/Catalog/SingleBook.shtml?
command=Search&db=^DB/CATALOG.db&eqSKUdata=0810860163

You can check to see if your local or university library has this bibliography yet at the following link: http://www.
worldcat.org/oclc/136782269

If your library doesn't have it yet, please encourage them to get it for their collections.

In the Fall of 2007, the Asian American Press newspaper featured a short article about this new work:  
http://hmongstudies.org/bibliographyarticle.pdf

WWW HMONG HOMEPAGE:

The Hmong Studies Internet Resource Center is partnering with Craig Rice to provide up-to-date content
related to community educational events, Hmong resources and Hmong Studies for the WWW Hmong
Homepage. Craig Rice co-founded the WWW Hmong Homepage in early 1994. The website was one of the first
to provide substantive educational resources related to Hmong-Americans and Hmong around the world. The
WWW Hmong Homepage is still one of the most heavily visited and linked educational websites related to the
Hmong. The latest update includes information about a newly available Hmong cookbook printed by the UW-
Extension in Eau Claire, WI. To view the WWW Hmong Homepage and learn about upcoming educational
events visit:
www.hmongnet.org

HMONG STUDIES MESSAGE BOARD:

A moderated message board intended as a forum for information about existing and new
research resources in Hmong Studies is available at:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hmongstudies/