HMONG STUDIES NEWSLETTER
Spring 2012

ONLINE PUBLICATION OF THE HMONG STUDIES INTERNET RESOURCE CENTER
(www.hmongstudies.org)

ABOUT THIS PUBLICATION: The Hmong Studies Newsletter has since 2001 provided a very unique and consistent
source of up-to-date information about new works in Hmong Studies and Hmong-related research resources. To
access back issues of this online publication dating back to 2001 visit:
http://www.hmongstudies.
org/HmongStudiesNewslettersindex.html

Hmong Studies Newsletter Editor: Mark E. Pfeifer, PhD

ABOUT THE HMONG STUDIES INTERNET RESOURCE CENTER:

The Hmong Studies Internet Resource Center (www.hmongstudies.org) is the online home of the Hmong Studies
Journal academic journal. This unique scholarly site also contains extensive bibliographies in Hmong Studies as well
as census data and an online research paper library.

Many of the Hmong Studies articles, books and dissertations listed in this newsletter and on the website may be found
at the Hmong Resource Center Library (
www.hmonglibrary.org) at the Hmong Cultural Center in Saint Paul, the
largest depository of Hmong Studies academic journal articles and graduate theses and dissertations in the United
States.

The Hmong Archives is a comprehensive historical archive of more than 115,000 Hmong-related documents, books
and artifacts. Located in Saint Paul, MN, visit
www.hmongarchives.org to learn about the Hmong Archives collection.  

NEW WORKS IN HMONG STUDIES:

Books/Theses/Reports

Vincent Her and Mary Louise Buley-Meissner, Editors. (2012). Hmong and American: From Refugees to
Citizens. Saint Paul: Minnesota Historical Society Press.
This anthology features several essays by scholars,
writers, artists and community activists pertaining to a variety of facets of Hmong American identity including gender,
sexual orientation, religion, culture, age, art, and social class. Learn more about the book at this link:
http://shop.mnhs.
org/moreinfo.cfm?Product_ID=3114

Hyojin Im. (2012). A Social Ecology of Stress and Coping among Homeless Refugee Families. PhD
Dissertation,  University of Minnesota.
Utilizing three theoretical frameworks -  social ecology theory, stress and
coping theory, and social capital theory, the researcher developed a series of hypothetical statements as well as
research questions to modify and refine hypotheses on stress and coping processes of refugee families. A modified
analytic induction method was adopted for analysis of interview data from 26 Hmong and Somali families who had
experienced Homelessness in the Twin Cities area. View the full text of this dissertation here:
http://conservancy.umn.
edu/bitstream/116170/1/Im_umn_0130E_12210.pdf

Cynthia J. Larson. (2012). The Relationship of Provider Cultural Competence and Utilization of Prenatal
Care in the Hmong of Minnesota, PhD Dissertation, Walden University.
This study used a cross-sectional
quantitative design grounded by cultural competency constructs and ethnic origins theory to explore and assess  
relationships between provider cultural competence, adequacy of prenatal care, and neonatal health outcomes in
Hmong women.

Eden A. Kaiser. (2011). Sociophonetics of Hmong American English in Minnesota. PhD Dissertation,
University of Minnesota.
Utilizing studies of production and perception of vowels involved in sound changes, the
researcher of this study investigated whether Hmong Americans have established any elements of an ethnic dialect of
English that communicates an identity that is uniquely Hmong American. Specifically, the author examined Hmong
Americans' participation in three sound changes: the "Northern Cities Shift" the "low back merger", and fronting of the
high back vowel (/u/ or goose). Their degrees of participation in those sound changes are compared to age-matched
European Americans from the same region. View the full text of this dissertation here:
http://conservancy.umn.
edu/bitstream/117394/1/Kaiser_umn_0130E_12293.pdf

Academic Journal Articles/Other

Gavin Bart. et al. (2012). "Superior Methadone Treatment Outcome in Hmong compared with non-Hmong
Patients." Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment,  Epub online prior to print.
This paper describes a study
involving opium-addicted Hmong attending an urban methadone maintenance program in Minneapolis, MN, who were
matched by gender and date of admission with predominately heroin-addicted non-Hmong (predominant route of
administration: injection) attending the same program, and both groups were evaluated for treatment outcomes after
1 year.

Christine Bonnin and Sarah Turner. (2012). "At what price rice? Food security, livelihood vulnerability,
and state interventions in upland northern Vietnam." Geoforum, 43: 95-105.
This study investigates how
Hmong and Yao households in Lào Cai province of Vietnam respond to the state-mandated introduction of hybrid
seeds, negotiate over their use, and attempt to contest and subtly resist their wholesale adoption. The authors
assess social, cultural and political aspects of state interventions in upland farmer decisionmaking.

Patrick F. Clarkin. (2012). "War, forced displacement and growth in Laotian adults." Annals of Human
Biology, 39(1): 36-45.
The author of this study administered retrospective questionnaires on displacement and
resettlement experiences and anthropometric data to a sample of Hmong and Lao refugees born in Laos or Thailand
and who had resettled in French Guiana or the U.S. The researcher's findings suggest that forced displacement from
war appears to have a lasting effect on final adult height, sitting height and leg length, although not necessarily on the
sitting height ratio in his sample.

Anne Futterman Collier, Martha Munger and Yong Kay Moua.  (2012). "Hmong Mental Health Needs
Assessment: A Community-Based Partnership in a Small Mid-Western Community." American Journal of
Community Psychology, 49: 73-86.   
This research paper describes a study that was conducted to assess the
mental health needs of Hmong living in Eau Claire, WI. Using a Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR)
model, the authors held four focus groups with 36 men, women, adolescents and professionals, all of Hmong descent,
and also interviewed 28 individual medical, mental health, education, and social service providers in the Eau Claire
community.

Christin DePouw. (2012). "When Culture implies Deficit: Placing Race at the Center of Hmong American
Education." Race, Ethnicity, and Education, 15(2): 223-239.
The author of this research article analyzes Hmong
American education from a critical race perspective. The researcher highlights Whiteness as property and recognizes
the fluid and situated racialization of Hmong American students. The author argues that majoritarian explanations of
inequities in Hmong American education often describe and marginalize Hmong American student and family
experiences in terms of ‘culture clash’ or profound cultural difference, thereby obscuring the ways in which Hmong
American communities have been racialized as refugees, as Southeast Asians, and as ‘Blackened’ and gendered low
income communities of color.

Marc Garellek. (2012). "The timing and sequencing of coarticulated non-modal phonation in English and
White Hmong." Journal of Phonetics, 40: 152-161.
This study investigates the acoustics of breathy-to-creaky
phonation contours in vowels from a production study of native speakers of English and White Hmong. The
researcher observes that the two languages differ in the nature of the non-modal phonation types. In the English
corpus, both the breathiness and creakiness are non-contrastive. In the Hmong corpus, the breathiness can be
contrastive or a result of coarticulation with a neighboring segment, but the creakiness is always contrastive.

Serge Lee and Jenny Chang. (2012). "Mental Health Status of the Hmong Americans in 2011: Three
Decades Revisited." Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation, 11:1, 55-70.
This article provides a
comprehensive overview of the mental health status of Hmong Americans over the past 35 years. The findings of this
article indicate that the Hmong still have high rates of being diagnosed with depression, a low level of help-seeking
behaviors in utilizing Western medicine, and a low arithmetic average of ‘‘happiness’’ scaled on an assessment tool.

Ava L. McCall & Bee Vang. (2012). Preparing Preservice Teachers to Meet the Needs of Hmong Refugee
Students, Multicultural Perspectives, 14:1, 32-37.
In this article, the authors recommend to educators a
multicultural social justice approach to teaching about refugee cultures. They also posit specific ideas for teaching
authentically about the Hmong refugee culture.

Laurie L. Meschke and Kim Dettmer. (2012). ""Don't Cross a Man's Feet': Hmong Parent-Daughter
Communication about Sexual Health." Sex Education, 12(1): 109-123.
The authors of this study used content
analysis to investigate parent-adolescent communication about sexual health for 44 pregnant or parenting Hmong
adolescent girls. The authors suggest that the results identify opportunities for culturally-relevant sex education
materials in the U.S. Hmong community.

Shinsuke Nakai. (2012). "Pig Domestication Processes: An Analysis of Varieties of Household Pig
Reproduction Control in a Hillside Village in Northern Thailand." Human Ecology, 40: 145–152.
In this article,
the author describes the data from a case study of the management of pig reproduction among Hmong villagers
in northern Thailand. The author also discusses the range of factors that influenced household selection of methods
for pig reproduction control.

Muhammed Y. Sheikh, et al. (2012). "Prevalence of Hepatitis B Infection Among Young and Unsuspecting
Hmong Blood Donors in the Central California Valley." Journal of Community Health, 37:181–185.
The goal
of this study was to contribute to the limited data on HBV prevalence in the Hmong population in the Central California
Valley. The overall prevalence in Hmong was observed at 3.41% (95%CI 2.3–4.9) compared to 0.06% (95%CI 0.05–
0.07) in donors of all ethnicities. The researchers reemphasize the unequivocal need to develop robust preventive
and treatment strategies for HBV in the Hmong community.

Kamonnate Srithi, et al. (2012). "Medicinal plants used in Hmong women’s healthcare in northern
Thailand." Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 139 (2012) 119– 135.
The authors of this article studied traditional
knowledge of medicinal plants used for women’s healthcare in three Hmong villages in northern Thailand and
determined how prevalent such knowledge is. The researchers documented traditional medical practices and
determined which of the species used are culturally important among the Hmong.

Sheryl Thorburn, Jennifer Kue,  Karen Levy Keon and Patela Lo. (2011). "Medical Mistrust and
Discrimination in Health Care: A Qualitative Study of Hmong Women and Men." Journal of Community
Health, Epub online prior to print.
In this study, the authors explored medical mistrust among Hmong women
and men, their experiences with discrimination in health care, and how these factors may influence Hmong women’s
breast and cervical cancer screening behavior. The researchers conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews with
women and men who were members of the Hmong community in Oregon.

Sarah Turner. (2012). "Making a Living the Hmong Way: An Actor-Oriented Livelihoods Approach to
Everyday Politics and Resistance in Upland Vietnam." Annals of the Association of American Geographers,
102:2, 403-422.
The author of this study utilizes ethnographic data to examine how Hmong ethnic minority individuals
and households supplement primarily agricultural livelihoods by navigating new economic opportunities, while also
resisting unwanted reliance on the market. Based in Sa Pa district, L`ao Cai province of Vietnam, the research in this
article identifies three particular diversification strategies—cardamom cultivation, textile trade, and tourism trekking—
that constitute the foremost cash component of Hmong livelihoods that are otherwise primarily subsistence based.

CALL FOR PAPERS HMONG STUDIES JOURNAL VOLUME 13, DEADLINE MAY 30,
2012
:

The Hmong Studies Journal is currently accepting submissions for Volume 13. More information is available here:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/HSJCFP2012volume13.html

HMONG POPULATION DATA FROM 2010 CENSUS POSTED:

The Hmong American Profile from the 2008-10 American Community Survey has been posted for the United States,
California, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. Please visit this link to access the data: h
ttp://www.hmongstudies.
org/HmongProfiles2010AmericanCommunitySurvey.html

Mark E. Pfeifer, PhD has prepared the following Hmong American Population Data Tables for Hmong National
Development:

2010 Census Hmong Populations of U.S. Metro and Micro Areas

2010 Census Hmong Populations by State

2010 Census Top Census Tracts by Hmong Population

HMONG STUDIES JOURNAL PANEL HELD AT UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA:

A Hmong Studies Journal panel was held with the Asian American Studies Program at the University of Minnesota on
Friday, March 9, 2012. The event successfully filled a lecture room to capacity on the West Bank of the University of
Minnesota-Twin Cities campus. To learn more about this event visit:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/HSJPanel2012UMN.
html

COMPREHENSIVE AND EXPANDED HMONG STUDIES RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHIES
ARE ONLINE:

Doing research on a Hmong Studies research topic? More than 40 comprehensive and frequently updated online
subject bibliographies of Hmong Studies works are available at the following link:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/HmongBibliographies

A 2007-Present research bibliography is updated every few weeks with information about the latest research
publications in Hmong Studies, online links to text are included where applicable:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/HmongStudiesPublications2007Present.html

HMONG STUDIES JOURNAL PUBLISHES VOLUME 12:

The Hmong Studies Journal published volume 12 in December 2011. To read the press release visit this link:
http://hmongstudies.org/HSJ12PressRelease.pdf

OTHER NEWS IN HMONG STUDIES:

Hmong Cultural Center Resource Library (Saint Paul) Spring 2012 Newsletter

The informative Spring 2012 edition of the Hmong Cultural Center Resource Library newsletter may be viewed at this
link:
http://hmongcc.org/HmongResourceCenterLibraryNewsletterSpring2012.pdf

Doctoral Candidate, Ma Vang, Receives Best Graduate Paper Award at Association of Asian American
Studies Conference  (Submitted by Dr. Chia Youyee Vang, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee)

Doctoral Candidate Ma Vang of UC-San Diego received the Best Graduate Paper Award at the 2012 AAAS
Conference. To learn more visit the link below:
http://hmongstudies.org/MaVangAwardSpring2012.pdf

Better Places Video (Submitted by Dr. Louisa Schein, Rutgers University-New Brunswick)

Better Places: The Hmong of Providence a Generation Later is the sequel to The Best Place to Live, a 1981
documentary about the early resettlement of the Hmong community in Providence, Rhode Island.

The Hmong in the original documentary came as refugees from Southeast Asia, where they had fought alongside the
United States during the Vietnam War. In Better Places: The Hmong of Providence a Generation Later, RISD
filmmaker Peter O'Neill and Rutgers University anthropologist Louisa Schein pick up the story 25 years later, pursuing
longtime friendships to take a look at what has become of the families they had documented a generation earlier. This
sequel, shot over five years, features personal and vivid footage of the daily lives, ceremonies, and ongoing
relationships of Hmong Americans from one small city.

The link for individual purchase of this new documentary is here:
http://www.embeestudio.com/store.php

The link for institutional purchase of the documentary is here: http://www.embeestudio.com/hmongresettlement/

For more information about this new video documentary contact Professor Louisa Schein at: schein@rci.rutgers.edu

FACEBOOK AND TWITTER PAGES FOR THE HMONG STUDIES JOURNAL:

The Hmong Studies Journal has a Facebook page and a Twitter feed. Updates about the journal and items of interest
pertaining to Hmong Studies research are posted on the Facebook and Twitter pages.

To view the Hmong Studies Journal Facebook page visit:
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Hmong-Studies-Journal/109572888812?ref=nf

To view the Hmong Studies Journal Twitter feed visit:
http://twitter.com/HmongStudies

ADDITIONAL VOLUMES OF HMONG STUDIES JOURNAL AVAILABLE IN PRINT:

Volumes 4-11 of the Hmong Studies Journal are available for order in a physical, print format through Hmong ABC
Bookstore in Saint Paul.

For more info visit the following link:
http://www.hmongabc.com/store/home.php

ONLINE RESEARCH LIBRARY AT HMONG STUDIES INTERNET RESOURCE CENTER:

A growing library of links to full-text research articles and other documents related to Hmong Studies and Southeast
Asian American Studies is available at the following link:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/OnlineLibrary.html

A BIBLIOGRAPHIC GUIDE TO HMONG STUDIES RESEARCH 2005-2010:

A Bibliographic Guide to Hmong Studies Research 2005-2010 is now available online. This guide is intended as an
introduction to recent research in different subfields of Hmong Studies including Health, Socioeconomics, Race
Relations, Education, Gender, and Hmong in Asia Studies. The guide also includes observations on Areas in Need of
Additional Research and on the development of Hmong Studies more generally. To view this publication visit:
http://hmongstudies.org/ABibliographicGuidetoRecentHmongResearch2011.pdf

WWW HMONG HOMEPAGE:

The Hmong Studies Internet Resource Center is partnering with Craig Rice to provide up-to-date content related to
community educational events, Hmong resources and Hmong Studies for the WWW Hmong Homepage. Craig Rice co-
founded the WWW Hmong Homepage in early 1994. The website was one of the first to provide substantive
educational resources related to Hmong-Americans and Hmong around the world. The WWW Hmong Homepage is
still one of the most heavily visited and linked resource portal websites related to the Hmong. To view the recently
revamped WWW Hmong Homepage and learn about news in Hmong Studies visit:
www.hmongnet.org

HMONG STUDIES MESSAGE BOARD:

A moderated message board intended as a forum for information about existing and new
research resources in Hmong Studies is available at:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hmongstudies/