HMONG STUDIES NEWSLETTER
Summer 2008 (July-September 2008)

ONLINE PUBLICATION OF THE HMONG STUDIES INTERNET RESOURCE
CENTER (www.hmongstudies.org)

ABOUT THIS PUBLICATION: The Hmong Studies Resource Newsletter has since 2001 provided a very unique
and consistent source of up-to-date information about new works in Hmong Studies and
Hmong-related research resources. To access back issues of this online publication dating back to
2001 visit:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/HmongStudiesNewslettersindex.html

Hmong Studies Newsletter Editor: Mark E. Pfeifer, PhD

ABOUT THE HMONG STUDIES INTERNET RESOURCE CENTER:

The Hmong Studies Internet Resource Center (www.hmongstudies.org) is the online home of the Hmong
Studies Journal academic journal. The unique scholarly site also contains extensive bibliographies in Hmong
Studies as well as census data and an online research paper library.

Many of the Hmong Studies articles, books and dissertations listed in this newsletter and on the website may be
found at the Hmong Resource Center Library at the Hmong Cultural Center in Saint Paul, perhaps the largest
depository of Hmong Studies academic articles and dissertations in the United States. The Hmong Resource
Center Library of the Hmong Cultural Center is open to the public Monday through Friday from 9 – 5. Other
times are available by appointment. The Hmong Resource Center is located in the Hmong Cultural Center’s
offices at 995 University Avenue, Suite 214 in Saint Paul. Phone: 651-917-9937. Librarians: Xai Lor, Cher Vue
and Ray Murray. E-Mail:
xailor@hmongcc.org

Link to Hmong Resource Center Library Online Catalog:

Walk-ins are welcome and there are many displays to look at that teach about the Hmong people, their history,
their culture and their experience in the U.S. over the past 25 years. Larger group tours and educational
sessions may be arranged in advance.

NEW WORKS IN HMONG STUDIES:

Books/Theses/Reports

Eldridge, Margaret Ursula. (2008). "New Mountain, New River, New Home? The Tasmanian Hmong."
M.S. Thesis, University of Tasmania.
This graduate study examines the first group of Hmong refugees
resettled in Tasmania, Australia after the 1975 Communist takeover of Laos. The thesis then examines the
possible reasons for the secondary migration of the Hmong refugees to various locations in Queensland,
Australia. Read this thesis online at this link:
http://eprints.utas.edu.au/7276/

Krueger, Linda. (2007). “Wisconsin Hmong Experiences with Hemodialysis.” M.S. Thesis, University
of Wisconsin-Stout.
This graduate study assesses the experiences of Hmong hemodialysis patients and
nurses who work with them. The research was conducted at two Wisconsin hospitals with hemodialysis units.
View this thesis online at the following link:
http://www.uwstout.edu/lib/thesis/2007/2007kruegerl.pdf

Lee, John K. (2008). “The Family Characteristics, Parenting Methods, and Parental Education
Philosophies, Experiences, and Expectations of Hmong Parents and Children.” PhD Dissertation,
Capella University.
This PhD study compares and contrasts general family characteristics, parental
involvement experiences, parental education expectations and family cohesiveness of Hmong high school
students of higher and lower academic achievement from Wisconsin.

Lor, Gjinn. (2008). “The Vietnam War: Two Hmong Soldiers’ Personal Experience in the Secret War.”
MS Thesis, University of Wisconsin-Stout.
This graduate study provides information derived from
interviews with two Hmong individuals who participated in the Vietnam War. The thesis describes these
individual’s personal experiences in the war and the strategies they used to escape Laos. Read this thesis
online at the following link:
http://www.uwstout.edu/lib/thesis/2007/2007lorg.pdf

Sechrist, Zachary S. (2007). “The Relationship of Hmong Students’ Ethnic Identity Development to
Self-Esteem and Academic Achievement.” EdS Dissertation, University of Wisconsin-Stout.
This
graduate study looks at the relationship between ethnic identity development, self-esteem and academic
achievement among a sample of Hmong high school students in Wisconsin. View this thesis online at the
following link:
http://www.uwstout.edu/lib/thesis/2008/2008secristz.pdf

Vang, ThaoPhia S. (2008). “User Resistance to Information Technology: A Case Study of the Hmong
American Partnership.” DBA Dissertation, Capella University.
This graduate research study examines
various factors that influenced individual user acceptance and resistance to new technology at a Hmong non-
profit organization.

Vang, Xeev Xwm. (2007). “Awareness of Hmong Religious Practices and Rituals in Regards to
Counseling Hmong Students.” MS Thesis, University of Wisconsin-Stout.
This graduate study reviews
the literature pertaining to the traditional Hmong religion and Hmong Christianity with the goal of providing
information to school counselors who counsel Hmong students in both religions. Read this thesis online at the
following link:  
http://www.uwstout.edu/lib/thesis/2007/2007vangx.pdf

Yang, Phillip Pao. (2008). “A Phenomenological Case Study: Factors in Hmong-American Students’
Successful Transition to a Large Public Research Institution.” PhD Dissertation, Edgewood College.
This qualitative PhD study assesses variables impacting the first-semester transition of Hmong college students
enrolled at a large public university.

Vang, Sao; Mouanoutoua, Mouafu and Maychee Mua. (2008). I am a Hmong-American Child.
Minneapolis, MN: National Institute on Media and the Family.
A graphic Hmong-English children’s novel
produced by the National Institute on Media and the Family. The Hmong Studies Internet Resource Center
thanks Maychee Mua for donating a copy.

Academic Journal Articles/Other

Burgess, Diana; Fu, Steven S.; Joseph, Anne M., Hatsukami, Dorothy K., Solomon, Jody and Michelle
Van Ryn. (2008). “Understanding Smoking and Cessation among Hmong Smokers.” Journal of Health
Care for the Poor and Underserved 19: 442-451.
The authors of this study conducted focus groups with
Hmong American smokers in order to discern their beliefs and experiences related to smoking and cessation.   

Kan, Pui Fong and Kathryn Kohnert. (2008). “Fast Mapping by Bilingual Preschool Children.” Journal
of Child Language. 35(3): 495-514.
This study investigates relationships between age, fast mapping skills
and vocabulary knowledge in both English and Hmong among bilingual preschool children of Hmong origin.

Long, Lisa A. (2008). “Contemporary Women’s Roles through Hmong, Vietnamese, and American
Eyes.” Frontiers 29(1): 1-36.
This literary criticism article looks at representations of Vietnamese and Hmong
women in Vietnamese publications and public spaces in Vietnam and compares them to the representations of
women in the writings of Vietnamese American and Hmong American women.

Wong, Candice, Mouanoutoua, Vangleng and Meng-Jinn Chen. (2008). “Engaging Community in the
Quality of Hypertension Care Project with Hmong Americans.” Journal of Cultural Diversity 15(1): 30-
36.
This article provides information about the collaborative efforts between a team of researchers and the
Hmong community in developing and testing a quality of hypertension care survey instrument in California.

A BIBLIOGRAPHIC GUIDE TO HMONG STUDIES RESEARCH 2005-2008 NOW
AVAILABLE ONLINE:

A new bibliographic guide to Hmong Studies research published between 2005-2008 is now available for
viewing at:
http://hmongstudies.org/ABibliographicGuidetoRecentHmongResearch.pdf

ADDITIONAL VOLUMES OF HMONG STUDIES JOURNAL AVAILABLE IN PRINT:

Volumes 4-8 of the Hmong Studies Journal are now available for order in a physical, print format. For more info
visit the following link:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/HSJPrintingsPR08.html

ONLINE RESEARCH LIBRARY AT HMONG STUDIES INTERNET RESOURCE
CENTER:

A growing library of links to full-text research articles and other documents related to Hmong Studies and
Southeast Asian American Studies is available at the following link:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/OnlineLibrary.html

UPDATES AT HMONG STUDIES INTERNET RESOURCE CENTER AND HMONG
CULTURAL CENTER WEBSITES:

The Hmong Studies Internet Resource Center website is updated several times a month with research oriented
features. To view this site one may visit the following link:
www.hmongstudies.org

The Hmong Cultural Center in Saint Paul has added a new blog, calendar and other features at its website. To
visit the site, click on the following link:
www.hmongcc.org

3 new videos of lectures in the Building Bridges multicultural education program by Txongpao Lee, Hmong
Cultural Center Executive Director have been posted.

Hmong Shamanism
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=8433917489102710972&hl=en

The Hmong Marriage Ceremony
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QlvXgRjlhi4

The Hmong Funeral Ceremony
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-2507884663001167459&hl=en

View the complete Hmong Cultural Center video library here:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/LearnaboutHmongvideos2007

COMPREHENSIVE HMONG STUDIES RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHIES ARE
ONLINE:

Doing research on a Hmong Studies research topic? More than 30 Comprehensive and frequently updated
online subject bibliographies of Hmong Studies works are available at the following link:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/HmongBibliographies

HMONG CULTURAL CENTER’S RESOURCE CENTER LIBRARY ONLINE
CATALOG HOLDINGS LISTS:

Hmong Cultural Center in Saint Paul provides lists of holdings in its Resource Center library on its website at
www.hmongcc.org. The library section of the center’s website may be reached at:
http://www.hmongcc.org/ResourceCenterLibrary.html

Hmong Cultural Center’s library collection includes the following:

- About 600 Hmong-related books and periodicals. A complete and updated list (Summer 2008) is here:
http://hmongcc.org/BookIndexlist08.pdf

About 300 Hmong-related dissertations and theses. A complete and updated list (Summer 2008) is here:
http://hmongcc.org/DissertationandThesisDoublelinesheet08.pdf

- About 750 Hmong-related academic journal articles from peer-reviewed journals. A  list of the journal articles
in the collection is here:
http://hmongcc.org/AcademicJournalsIndex.pdf

More comprehensive in its focus than any university or public library, the Hmong Cultural Center Resource
Library is the largest collection of Hmong-related academic research publications in Minnesota and most likely
the United States. The most distinctive and specialized portions of the library are the dissertations/theses and
peer-reviewed journal article collections.

For information about using this unique, special collections library call Xai Lor, Cher Vue or Ray Murray at 651-
917-9937.

HMONG STUDIES CLASSES OFFERED BY ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES
PROGRAM AT UW-MADISON:

(E-Mail message from Lynet Uttal, Director of the Asian American Studies Program forwarded by Larry Ashmun,
UW-Madison)

“Dear everyone,

I am very happy to announce that we will be joined by Prof. Leena Her as the visiting assistant professor in
Hmong Studies in the Asian American Studies Program for 2008-2009.  

Prof. Leena Her received her PhD from Stanford University in Anthropology of Education with concentrations in
Minority and Ethnic Populations (focusing on Hmong, Laotian, and Vietnamese), Lingustic Anthropology, and
Urban Education.  She was an undergraduate at the University of California, Berkeley, where she majored in
Cultural Anthropology, Psychology and minored in Education.   She will be returning from Laos where she was
on a 2008-2009 Fulbright Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, at the National University of Laos, Vientiane,
Institute of International Education.  She is also a member of the Critical Hmong Studies Collective and speaks
Hmong fluently.  

In our search committee, we discussed the differences between three waves of Hmong Studies: the first wave
Hmong Studies (anthropological/historical), second wave Hmong Studies (identity/cultural nationalist
perspective) and third wave Hmong Studies (critical race perspective that examines specific experiences of
Hmong people as connected to the larger social, historical, political, economic, and ethnic contexts).  When
asked where she situated herself, Prof. Her said:

"I see these different waves, and the theories characterizing each wave, as conversations and dialogues
between researchers across time. Over the past eight years my work as a researcher has been to counter
some of the ideas presented in the preceding conversations of the first and second wave. For example, I have
worked to counter the idea that the cultural differences between ethnic groups can be a legitimate explanation
of minority academic failure (i.e. “Hmong culture is historically an oral culture. The people are preliterate.
Hmong students enter school without any experiences with written words and text. This might explain why they
do not perform well in school.”) In response, my work reflects the shift in theoretical perspective where the
experiences of particular groups of people can no longer be particularized, but must be situated within a larger
political, social, and historical context. Consequently, my work in the field of education examines minority
performance in school (minority academic failure) as a phenomena set within an institutional context and
framed by the American cultural ideals of equality and meritocracy."

Regarding teaching, she said: "Inside the classroom my goal as an educator is to teach students to be action
oriented, but to give them the theoretical tools they need to critically examine the work that they are doing and
to be aware of the constraints they are working in while in the community. One of the best ways to learn social
theory is to become engaged in the social world, to take notes, and then to critically analyze the information
gathered." Professor Her will be teaching Asian American 240 "Hmong American Experiences in the U.S." which
will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 4-5:15 in B223 Van Vleck.  She will also be facilitating a Speaker
Series in Hmong Scholarship that will be open to the community, students, staff and faculty.  

We are very excited to have her here to both teach classes as well as to forward our conversation about
Hmong Studies at UW-Madison.

Lynet”

HMONG STUDIES RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY PUBLISHED:

A bibliography consisting of more than 600 annotations of Hmong Studies-related scholarly research works
published between 1996-2006 has been released by The Scarecrow Press, a subsidiary of Rowman Littlefield
specializing in academic bibliographies and reference works. This new volume represents the first Hmong
Studies annotated research bibliography published since the mid-1990s. To learn more about this work visit the
following webpage:
 http://www.scarecrowpress.com/Catalog/SingleBook.shtml?
command=Search&db=^DB/CATALOG.db&eqSKUdata=0810860163

You can check to see if your library has this bibliography yet at the following link: http://www.worldcat.
org/oclc/136782269

If your library doesn't have it yet, please encourage them to get it for their collections.

In the Fall of 2007, the Asian American Press newspaper featured a short article about this new work:  
http://hmongstudies.org/bibliographyarticle.pdf

WWW HMONG HOMEPAGE:

The Hmong Studies Internet Resource Center is partnering with Craig Rice to provide up-to-date content
related to community educational events, Hmong resources and Hmong Studies for the WWW Hmong
Homepage. Craig Rice co-founded the WWW Hmong Homepage in early 1994. The website was one of the first
to provide substantive educational resources related to Hmong-Americans and Hmong around the world. The
WWW Hmong Homepage is still one of the most heavily visited and linked educational websites related to the
Hmong. To view the WWW Hmong Homepage and learn about upcoming educational events visit:
www.
hmongnet.org

HMONG STUDIES MESSAGE BOARD:

A moderated message board intended as a forum for information about existing and new
research resources in Hmong Studies is available at:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hmongstudies/