HMONG STUDIES NEWSLETTER
WINTER 2010

ONLINE PUBLICATION OF THE HMONG STUDIES INTERNET RESOURCE CENTER
(www.hmongstudies.org)

ABOUT THIS PUBLICATION: The Hmong Studies Newsletter has since 2001 provided a very unique and consistent
source of up-to-date information about new works in Hmong Studies and
Hmong-related research resources. To access back issues of this online publication dating back to
2001 visit:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/HmongStudiesNewslettersindex.html

Hmong Studies Newsletter Editor: Mark E. Pfeifer, PhD

ABOUT THE HMONG STUDIES INTERNET RESOURCE CENTER:

The Hmong Studies Internet Resource Center (www.hmongstudies.org) is the online home of the Hmong Studies
Journal academic journal. This unique scholarly site also contains extensive bibliographies in Hmong Studies as well
as census data and an online research paper library.

Many of the Hmong Studies articles, books and dissertations listed in this newsletter and on the website may be found
at the Hmong Resource Center Library (
www.hmonglibrary.org) at the Hmong Cultural Center in Saint Paul, perhaps
the largest depository of Hmong Studies academic articles and dissertations in the United States. The Hmong
Resource Center Library of the Hmong Cultural Center is open to the public Monday through Friday from 9 – 5. Other
times are available by appointment. The Hmong Resource Center is located in the Hmong Cultural Center’s offices at
995 University Avenue, Suite 214 in Saint Paul.
Link to map: Phone: 651-917-9937. Librarians: Xai Lor and Cher Vue.
E-Mail:
xailor@hmongcc.org

Link to Hmong Resource Center Library Online Catalog:


NEW WORKS IN HMONG STUDIES:

Books/Theses/Reports

Zoua Chang. (2009). An investigation of Contextual Factors and Dispositional Characteristics in the Career
Development of Hmong American and Caucasian American College Students: A Comparison Study Using a
Social Cognitive Career Theory Perspective. PhD Dissertation, University of Minnesota.
This doctoral study
assessed race/ethnic and gender comparisons among more than 180 Hmong American and almost 200 Caucasian
American college students pertaining to career development variables. The researcher observed that Hmong
American college students reported more perceived educational and career barriers and fewer resources than did
Caucasian American college students. Hmong American female college students reported having more role model
support than did Hmong American male college students.

Paul Hillmer. (2009). A People’s History of the Hmong. Saint Paul, MN: Minnesota Historical Society Press.
This work draws upon more than 200 oral history interviews with Hmong Americans primarily in Minnesota to present
information about Hmong history, Hmong involvement in the Vietnam War in Laos, Hmong cultural practices and
Hmong adjustment and acculturation in the United States. More information about this volume is available at this link:

http://shop.mnhs.org/moreinfo.cfm?product_id=2235

Arlene K. Welcher. (2009). A Review of the Recommendations of the Hmong Resettlement Task Force and
the Implementation of these Recommendations. M.S. Thesis, University of Wisconsin-Stout.
This graduate
study examines the implementation of recommendations from the state of Wisconsin’s Hmong Resettlement Task
Force for the Hmong refugees who arrived in the state from Wat Tham Krabok in Thailand in the 2004-2006 period.
This thesis may be viewed online at the following link:
http://www.uwstout.edu/lib/thesis/2009/2009welchera.pdf

Academic Journal Articles/Other

Marjorie Kagawa-Singer, Sora Park Tanjasiri, Annalyn Valdez, Honglian Yu and Mary Anne Foo. (2009).
“Outcomes of a Breast Health Project for Hmong Women and Men in California.” American Journal of
Public Health 99(S2): S467-S473.
The authors of this article describe a community-based breast cancer screening
program tested among low-income Hmong women in central and southern California.

Jean Michaud. (2010). “Handling Mountain Minorities in China, Vietnam and Laos: From History and
Current Concerns.” Asian Ethnicity 10(1): 25-49.
This paper provides an overview of issues associated with
minorities (including the Hmong) residing in highland regions in Southwest China, Vietnam, and Laos.  The article
describes state strategies in these countries for engaging and managing these minority groups.  

Matthew J. Miller and Richard M. Lee. (2009). “Factorial Invariance of the Asian American Family Conflicts
Scale Across Ethnicity, Generational Status, Sex, and Nationality.” Measurement and Evaluation in
Counseling and Development 42(3): 179-196.
In this study, the authors examined the factorial invariance of the
Asian American Family Conflicts Scale-Likelihood (FCS-L) in a sample of 1,012 participants. The researchers
conclude that their results support the use of this research instrument in future research with diverse Asian
subgroups including Hmong Americans.

Christian Postert. “Moral Agency, Identity Crisis and Mental Health: An Anthropologist’s Plight and His
Hmong Ritual Healing.” (2010). Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry 34(1): 169-85.
In this article, the author
describes personal participation in a ritual healing ceremony in a Hmong village in Laos. The author uses this
experience to contrast Hmong perceptions of the
person to those associated with the practice of Psychiatry. The
author argues that psychiatric services should accommodate substantial differences in these concepts when treating
Hmong from Laos.   

Brenda L. Rooney, Rajiv Choudhary and Al Bliss. (2009). “Social Determinants of Smoking Among Hmong
Americans Residing in Wisconsin.” Wisconsin Medical Journal 108(9): 439-46.
This study assesses the
prevalence and correlates of tobacco use among Hmong persons residing in Wisconsin. Surveys were distributed in
14 communities through Hmong Mutual Assistance Associations. Among youth, 15% reported daily use, 32% reported
ever use. Among adults, prevalence of daily use was 20% and ever use was 35.9%. Among both youth and adults
usage was higher among males. The authors observed that education and household exposure are strong predictors
of smoking prevalence.

Susan L. Schantz, Joseph C. Gardiner, Andrea Aguiar, Xiaoqin Tang, Donna M. Gasior, Anne M. Sweeney,
Jennifer D. Peck, Douglas Gillard and Paul J. Kostyniak. (2010). “Contaminant Profiles in Southeast Asian
Immigrants Consuming Fish from Polluted Waters in Northeastern Wisconsin.” Environmental Research
110: 33-39.
The researchers of this study examined exposure to contaminants among men and women of Hmong
descent residing in Green Bay, Wisconsin where the Fox River and lower Green Bay are contaminated with PCBs and
mercury. The authors conclude that Hmong residing in this region are at risk of elevated PCB exposure from eating
locally caught fish.

James N. Stanford. (2010). “The Role of Marriage in Linguistic Contact and Variation: Two Hmong Dialects
in Texas.” Journal of Sociolinguistics 14(1): 89-115.
This study examines the role of marriage in dialect
acquisition and linguistic contact between speakers of the White Hmong and Mong Leng dialects residing in Texas.
The researcher’s results suggest that macro-level shifts in Hmong social organization and gender roles are reflected
and constructed by gendered, marriage-level dialect practices. The author observes that individual wives in his study
chose to challenge the traditional Hmong ideology pertaining to language behavior in cross-dialect marriages.

Claire Tugault-Lafleur and Sarah Turner. (2009). “The Price of Spice: Ethnic Minority Livelihoods and
Cardamom Commodity Chains in Upland Northern Vietnam.” Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography 30:
388-403.
This article examines the contemporary dynamics associated with the cultivation, harvesting and trade of
dried cardamom fruit by Hmong in Lao Cai province of Vietnam to consumers in Vietnam, China and the global
market.  

Sarah Turner and Jean Michaud (2009). “`Weapons of the Week’: Selective Resistance and Agency among
the Hmong in Northern Vietnam.” In Dominique Caouette and Sarah Turner, Editors, Agrarian Angst and
Rural Resistance in Contemporary Southeast Asia. London, New York: Routledge, 45-60.
This article
explores Hmong engagement in economic activities in Lao Cai province of Vietnam. The authors examine Hmong
participation in contemporary trade networks in this region and their use of culture of experience to modulate this
involvement. The researchers argue that the Hmong in Lao Cai selectively decide the degree of their market
integration and resist unwanted levels of dependency upon the broader market.  

HMONG STUDIES JOURNAL PUBLISHES VOLUME 10 ONLINE:

In December 2009, the Hmong Studies Journal published volume 10 on the internet. To read the press release and to
view the full-text of the scholarly articles, visit this link:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/HSJ10OnlinePR.html

CALL FOR PAPERS -  HMONG STUDIES JOURNAL VOLUME 11:

The Hmong Studies Journal is accepting submissions for its next issue, Volume 11. The deadline for submissions is
May 30, 2010. For more information visit this link:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/HSJCFP2010volume11.html

HMONG-RELATED RESEARCH PAPERS TO BE PRESENTED AT THE ASSOCIATION
FOR ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES CONFERENCE IN AUSTIN, TX APRIL 7-11, 2010:

The panel “Current Research on Hmong Americans and the Hmong Diaspora” will be part of the Association for Asian
American Studies Conference to be held at the Omni hotel in Austin, TX on Friday, April 9, 2010 from 1-2:30 PM.

Chair: Mark E. Pfeifer, Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi

Yang Sao Xiong, University of California, Los Angeles "Analysis of Poverty in Hmong American Communities."

Faith Nibbs, Southern Methodist University, "The Texas Two-Step, Hmong Style: A Delicate Dance Between Culture
and Ethnicity."

Sangmi Lee, Arizona State University, "Belonging Nowhere, Hmong People's Searching for Ethnic Homeland in the
Diaspora."

For more information about additional Hmong-related papers to be presented at the 2010 AAAS conference visit this
link:
http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/hmongstudies/message/375

General information about the 2010 Association for Asian American Studies Conference is available at this link:
http://www.aaastudies.org/2010/index.php

FACEBOOK AND TWITTER PAGES FOR THE HMONG STUDIES JOURNAL:

The Hmong Studies Journal has started a Facebook page and a Twitter feed. Updates about the journal and items of
interest pertaining to Hmong Studies research are posted on the Facebook and Twitter pages.

To view the Hmong Studies Journal Facebook page visit:
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Hmong-Studies-Journal/109572888812?ref=nf

To view the Hmong Studies Journal Twitter feed visit:
http://twitter.com/HmongStudies

OTHER NEWS IN HMONG STUDIES:

Hmong Language Exhibit at Memorial Library, UW-Madison

Larry Ashmun of the UW-Madison Libraries sends word of a special exhibit at UW-Madison’s Memorial Library in
February and March 2010 related to the Hmong language and the work of Father Yves Bertrais.

For more information visit this link:
http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/hmongstudies/message/376

Hmong Studies Research Group to Meet at Association for Asian Studies Conference in Philadelphia,
March 26, 2010

Professor Robert Entenmann of St. Olaf College passes along info about the 2nd annual meeting of the Hmong
Studies Research Group at the Association for Asian Studies Conference at the downtown Philadelphia Marriott in
Philadelphia, PA at 9 PM on Friday, March 26, 2010.

For more information about the Association for Asian Studies Conference visit this link:
http://www.aasianst.org/annual-
meeting/index.htm

(Madison) Capital Times Newspaper Article

“UW’s Efforts to Offer Hmong Studies Don’t Meet Expectations”, (Madison) Capital Times, February 16, 2010.

To view this recent newspaper article visit this link:
http://host.madison.com/ct/news/local/education/university/article_62800733-af30-5ad3-8e6c-70a24dd0b036.html

Native American/Hmong Culture Symposium, La Crosse, WI

Widening the Circle, a symposium to help teachers teach Wisconsin Native American & Hmong history, culture, critical
pedagogy and how to authenticate materials and infuse curriculum will be held in La Crosse, WI from April 15-17,
2010.

To learn more about this conference visit:
http://hmongstudies.org/WideningTheCircleBrochure.pdf

DETAILED 2008 AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY DATA RELEASED FOR HMONG  
AMERICANS:

In the Fall of 2009, the U.S. Census Bureau released detailed demographic info for the Hmong American
population across the United States from the 2008 American Community Survey. The detailed Hmong
American data may be viewed at this link:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/2008SEAAmericanCommunitySurvey.html

Additional Information about how to access this dataset or other Hmong-related census data is available at this link:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/AccessingHmongCensusData.html

COMPREHENSIVE HMONG STUDIES RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHIES ARE ONLINE:

Doing research on a Hmong Studies research topic? More than 30 Comprehensive and frequently updated online
subject bibliographies of Hmong Studies works are available at the following link:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/HmongBibliographies

A newly created 2007-Present research bibliography is updated every few weeks with information about the latest
research publications in Hmong Studies, online links to text are included where applicable:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/HmongStudiesPublications2007Present.html

ADDITIONAL VOLUMES OF HMONG STUDIES JOURNAL AVAILABLE IN PRINT:

Volumes 4-9 of the Hmong Studies Journal are now available for order in a physical, print format through Hmong ABC
Bookstore in Saint Paul.

For more info visit the following link:
http://www.hmongabc.com/store/home.php

ONLINE RESEARCH LIBRARY AT HMONG STUDIES INTERNET RESOURCE CENTER:

A growing library of links to full-text research articles and other documents related to Hmong Studies and Southeast
Asian American Studies is available at the following link:
http://www.hmongstudies.org/OnlineLibrary.html

WWW HMONG HOMEPAGE:

The Hmong Studies Internet Resource Center is partnering with Craig Rice to provide up-to-date content related to
community educational events, Hmong resources and Hmong Studies for the WWW Hmong Homepage. Craig Rice co-
founded the WWW Hmong Homepage in early 1994. The website was one of the first to provide substantive
educational resources related to Hmong-Americans and Hmong around the world. The WWW Hmong Homepage is
still one of the most heavily visited and linked educational websites related to the Hmong. To view the WWW Hmong
Homepage and learn about upcoming educational events visit:
www.hmongnet.org

HMONG STUDIES MESSAGE BOARD:

A moderated message board intended as a forum for information about existing and new
research resources in Hmong Studies is available at:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hmongstudies/